Journey through Moodland by Angelo Facchini

Angelo Facchini‘s passion for photography comes from a child, browsing through photo albums with beautiful black and white photos from the 70s of family groups. Growing up, the curiosity and the desire to photograph increased. In his main occupation, he works as an accountant.

Angelo’s journey with photography could be divided into 2 periods. Initially, in the analogical age, the main subjects were groups of friends and holiday landscapes. The digital age has given a new course and the possibility of operating in post-production. Attention has been paid more on the surrounding world: the region Puglia is the main subject of the photos, with the streets, and the unexpected opportunities they offer, and the landscape.

The detail is the main interpretation key. Angelo Facchini’s photography focuses on color and light. The color becomes predominant of processing. A color photo is alive, it attracts the viewer’s gaze, it is its vision of the world represented photographically.

Next to the color is the black & white, the presence of light or its absence in its purest. But his “black & white” is always colorful, in the sense that the nuances, the contrasts, the gradations do not make you feel the lack of color. His path is constantly evolving.

Meeting the photographer Franco Fontana at an exhibition and sharing the words of the master had a great effect on him. “Never think of having arrived, always consider yourself a beginner who has yet to learn”. That’s why he constantly learns more and achieves more.

He has participated in several exhibitions: “Calce e Sale” within the collective Mari and Terre del Sud in Trieste in 2009; “Alkjimie Cromatiche” in 2011 in Bari; “Made in Italy” in Rome in 2012; in 2011 and 2012 present at the “Nettuno Photofestival”. He’s also present in some publications of photographic magazines: “The Photographer”, and participated in a photo book “Synergie Visive”.

“To the complaint, ‘There are no people in these photographs,’ I respond, There are always two people: the photographer and the viewer.” Ansel Adams
“What he sought was always something lying ahead, and even if it was a matter of the past it was a past that changed gradually as he advanced on his journey, because the traveller’s past changes according to the route he has followed: not the immediate past, that is, to which each day that goes by adds a day, but the more remote past. Arriving at each new city, the traveller finds again a past of his that he did not know he had: the foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.” Italo Calvino

 

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Michael Nguyen

Editor-in-chief TAGREE